Browsing All Posts filed under »social sciences«

Symposium on Stevenson’s The City

September 18, 2014 by

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Studies in Emergent Order is proud to publish a symposium on Professor Deborah Stevenson’s The City. Dr. Stevenson’s book explores the fields of urban sociology and urban studies and how they shape our understandings of contemporary cities. She examines the basic theoretical and analytical frameworks used in urban studies and applies them to the most important issues […]

New Articles Published on Innovation, Complex Systems and Computation and Heterogeneity in Social Science Research

March 29, 2014 by

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Studies in Emergent Order is pleased to publish “Innovation, Complex Systems and Computation: Technological Space and Speculations on the Future” by Troy Camplin and Euel Elliott and “The Meaning and the Implications of Heterogeneity for Social Science Research” by Peter Lewin. Drs. Camplin and Elliot’s article puts forward a theoretical framework for understanding the critical role of technological innovation in modern […]

Symposium on Coyne’s Doing Bad by Doing Good

March 19, 2014 by

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Studies in Emergent Order is proud to publish a symposium on Professor Christopher J. Coyne’s Doing Bad by Doing Good: Why Humanitarian Action Fails. Dr. Coyne’s book applies the economic way of thinking to look at why humanitarian efforts led by governments and NGOs fail repeatedly. Using case studies from diverse places, including Haiti, New Orleans, Libya, and Afghanistan, […]

Symposium on Klein’s Knowledge and Coordination

March 12, 2014 by

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Studies in Emergent Order is proud to publish a symposium on Professor Daniel B. Klein’s Knowledge and Coordination: A Liberal Interpretation. Dr. Klein’s book reexamines some basic elements of economic liberalism by looking at Friedrich Hayek’s notion of spontaneous order through the lens of a Smithian spectator and distinguishing Hayek, Ronald Coase, and Michael Polanyi’s notion of concatenate coordination […]

Interesting case of science vs the market

January 15, 2012 by

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One of the least explored yet most important aspects of how spontaneous orders manifest in the modern world is that of the tensions between them, tensions that undermine the traditional classical liberal vision of harmony arising out of voluntary interactions. A fascinating example is that of the tensions between the incentives rewarded by the market […]

Problems with the concept of redistribution

November 10, 2011 by

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During our recent conference in Portsmouth, NH, some of our discussions revolved around questions related to the issue of income redistribution.  As the conversations progressed I had an insight that, if valid, frames these kinds of issues within a new context, one I think far more insightful than the usual ones.

New Hampshire problems illustrate importance of public values

September 27, 2011 by

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I have long argued that the public values democracies discover and implement are an essential part of a free society.  Market fundamentalists generally ignore the argument although many now acknowledge that a democracy is a spontaneous order, which is a start.  I recently read of a kerfluffle among libertarians in New Hampshire that illustrates my […]